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Freitag, 26. Februar 2016

Kräuter Garten by INFARM @ METRO Cash & Carry Deutschland (Full Version)



Fresh, Fresh und noch einmal Fresh, der Hintergrund warum die Metro in diesen Bereich investiert.

Ich würde mich freuen, wenn der ein oder andere Landwirt sich ebenfalls dazu entschließen könnte.



mehr Informationen finden Sie unter www.aquaponics-europe.com








Freitag, 12. Februar 2016

This Twisting Manhattan Tower Will Have a Park on Every Floor



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This Twisting Manhattan Tower Will Have a Park on Every Floor
// Gizmodo

This Twisting Manhattan Tower Will Have a Park on Every Floor

When you think of supertalls you probably think of pricey real estate—not leafy parks in the sky. A new 1000-foot tower going up in Manhattan provides a more interesting take: Hanging gardens that twirl down the exterior of the building like a giant green exclamation point marking the end of the High Line.

The 65-story supertall is named "The Spiral" and it's one of many new buildings planned around the Hudson Yards development, which is using an artificial foundation to suspend a new neighborhood over an active train yard. But this building has a very nice twist on the typical superskinny glass-and-steel skyscraper.

The Spiral will be tall—about as tall as the supertalls along a strip of 57th Street nicknamed Millionaire's Row—but the big difference here is that this tower is being built for office and retail space only. And from what Danish architect Bjarke Ingels told the Architect's Newspaper, it sounds like an exceptionally nice place to work:

Designed for the people that occupy it, The Spiral ensures that every floor of the tower opens up to the outdoors creating hanging gardens and cascading atria that connect the open floor plates from the ground floor to the summit into a single uninterrupted work space. The string of terraces wrapping around the building expand the daily life of the tenants to the outside air and light.

This Twisting Manhattan Tower Will Have a Park on Every Floor

What's exciting—besides the idea of standing in a cascading garden 65 stories above Manhattan—is that Ingels might be able to reimagine the supertall in a way that serves the city better than most of these proposals do now. Most supertalls are designed almost exclusively as places for the super-rich to reside (you know, where someone can buy a $100 million penthouse) and are subsequently angering residents who believe they simply contribute shade without adding anything to the streetscape. If even one of these sky plazas was open to the public, it would change the conversation dramatically about what a supertall could offer to locals.

Ingels has a thing for incorporating green infrastructure into his developments, like this almost-finished residential pyramid on 57th Street which hides a courtyard inside its walls. And he's thinking about bigger issues around energy and sustainability; he's designed two power plants which also function as community space. If anyone could design a socially responsible supertall, Ingels would be a very good candidate. Let's hope the building's agenda is as progressive as its appearance.

This Twisting Manhattan Tower Will Have a Park on Every Floor

[ArchPaper]

Renderings: BIG via Tishman Speyer

Follow the author at @awalkerinLA


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Sigurd A.Röber

Montag, 8. Februar 2016

Fischzucht in der Schweiz


Bild#Roeber#Sigurd


Dank Aquaponik

Eine alte Fischrasse kommt wieder zu neuen Ehren.

Fischzucht in der Schweiz.

Mit und dank Aquaponik werden alte Fischsorten in der Schweiz wieder belebt und gezüchtet.

In einem ehemaligen Fabrikgebäude in Balterswil haben Paul Wreford (36) und Philipp Hofbauer (53) eine Aquaponik-Fischzuchtanlage, die Aquaponic Gardens, aufgebaut. «Schon als Kind träumte ich von meiner eigenen Fischzucht», sagt der Australier Wreford. In der Aquaponik sehen er und sein Geschäftspartner das System der Zukunft: «Es ist sehr wassersparend und kommt ohne Chemikalien aus.»

weiter zum ganzen Artikel..........

Montag, 1. Februar 2016

Japanese Company to Build the World's First Autonomous Farm



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Japanese Company to Build the World's First Autonomous Farm
// Gizmodo

Japanese Company to Build the World's First Autonomous Farm

We had a hunch that the future of farming was going to be all about robots, and naturally, Japan is taking the lead. This morning, Kyoto-based firm Spread made a bold announcement: In two years time, it intends to be running the world's very first fully-automated, (mostly) human-free farm.

From watering seedlings to harvesting crops, robots will control nearly every aspect of this indoor lettuce production operation, according to company official Koji Morisada, who spoke about his autonomous farming ambitions with the AFP this morning.

But note the 'nearly.' Despite the fact that this future farm is being marketed as a bastion of automation, humans are still going to fill one very important roll.

"Seed planting will still be done by people, but the rest of the process, including harvesting, will be done [by industrial robots]," Morisada told AFP.

Still, by cutting most of the squishy meatbags out of the equation, Morisada hopes to slash personnel costs and energy expenses. There are no details yet on what sorts of robots the indoor farming company plans on using, but if you'd like a little help imagining our robot-farming future, check out these 13 crazy farming robots that already exist.

Spread's indoor grow house is slated to open in 2017.

[MSN]

Follow the author @themadstone

Top image: lettuce in indoor hydroponic system via, Shutterstock


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Sigurd A.Röber